Practical Advice

DO NOT:

Discuss your case with anyone, except members of this office or your doctors. Frequently, liability adjusters will contact neighbors and coworkers to obtain information. Misunderstood information transmitted by a friend or co- worker can be very damaging if given to an adjuster.

Sign any applications or requests dealing with your case until you receive approval from this office. This includes applications for Blue Cross or other insurance benefits, reports to the state, and disability or unemployment applications. A careless admission in your own writing can come back to haunt you at a later date.

Discuss your case with any insurance adjuster, other than your own company. Advise the adjuster to contact this office. Like an IRS agent, an insurance adjuster is not visiting with you to help you, he is hired by an insurance company to help defeat your claim. The adjuster is trained to identify liability problems, to pin you down or have you make admissions against your own interests. You do not have the training to understand the significance of each part of the interrogation or the consequences of your answers.

Believe that the information you give the adjuster from your own company will be held confidential or not be given to the other insurer. Be accurate, concise and provide only the information needed to process your claim. An insurer is entitled only to that information vital to this particular claim, nothing else. Remember, insurance companies are in the business of taking in premiums and not paying out claims. It is the adjuster who makes that happen.

Post information on a personal web page (i.e., My Space, Facebook, etc.) about your accident, injuries, physical activities, or your legal claim. Information contained in personal web pages may not reflect your actual circumstances and might possibly be used against you at a later date.

Allow one year or more to lapse between doctors’ visits. If you do, your insurer may be able to deny medical benefits based on a lapse of treatment.

DO:

SAVE AND TURN OVER TO US:

  • Correspondence, memoranda and other documents relating to your case.
  • Physical objects which may possibly have a bearing on your case.
  • Any other records relating to your case.

KEEP AND FURNISH US COPIES OF:

A diary of your complaints and activities, being careful to note:

  1. any ways in which your injuries have restricted your activities;
  2. specific pains and their frequency;
  3. the frequency of medication taken;
  4. the kinds of medication taken;
  5. the dates on which you are unable to work or perform duties.

OBTAIN AND SEND US RECEIPTS FOR:

  • Hospital bills;
  • Doctors’ bills;
  • Ambulance bills;
  • Nursing bills;
  • Drug or medicine bills (save all bottles or containers of medicine, including nonprescription drugs such as aspirin);
  • All other expenses incurred as a result of the injury, including, but not limited to:
    1. travel to and from doctors’ offices and hospitals (keep a notebook record of these expenses);
    2. additional help around the home or business, including babysitters, if applicable, and domestic or yard work.

*KEEP A NOTEBOOK RECORD OF THESE EXPENSES

NOTIFY US AT ONCE OF:

  • Any change of employment, raises or reductions in salary, or loss of job.
  • When you return to work.
  • Any change of address or telephone number.
  • How to reach you if you are going out of town for more than a few days.
  • Any work missed due to your injuries.
  • Anything else which may affect your case.

PROVIDE US WITH:

  • The names of any neighbors, friends, fellow employees, or relative who know of your activities both before and after the accident.
  • Any information that you think should be added to this list.